Both turboprop engines and turbofan engines are turbine engines that thermodynamically operate the same, producing thrust for flight. The two engines function in slightly different ways and use unique processes to make use of exhaust, and to produce thrust. Both types offer benefits for different operations, so it is helpful to understand what defines each. Depending on your specific aircraft, either a turboprop or a turbofan could be a better option for purchase, so this blog will explore the ins and outs of each type.
 
A major distinguishing factor is how both engines handle exhaust, as each engine produces thrust from a different path of airflow. In a turboprop engine, exhaust from the combustion process is used to power a propeller. This propeller produces thrust for the engine and leaves no exhaust energy to be expelled. On the other hand, the exhaust from both combusted and non-combusted air in a turbofan engine is released directly from the rear to produce thrust. The different designs for producing thrust also lead to different factors that determine efficiency.
 
While both engines function well in flight, and while there is no superior option, a few limiting design factors should be considered prior to purchase. First, since turboprop engines rely on propellers, different blade sizes and speeds produce different levels of power. Due to the need to increase blade lengths for greater speeds, efficient speed operating ranges are generally limited. Turboprop engines therefore operate best at subsonic speeds. Alternatively, turbofan engines can operate at higher speeds by controlling and lowering the speed of intake air as it passes through compressors at the front. Some of this air is further compressed while some of it is directed straight to the jet engine. This path prevents turbofan engines from being limited by high airspeeds the way that a turboprop engine is.
 
Meanwhile, turboprop engines face unique limitations that are not present in turbofan engines, including the engine’s internal temperatures, the compression ratio, and the nozzle design. While the engine takes in a lot of air, the nozzle can only produce a certain amount of thrust. Although they consume more fuel and are less efficient than turboprop engines, turbofans produce more relative thrust and have overall better performance capabilities. For example, the fastest plane to ever fly relied on a turbofan engine and reached an altitude over 85,000 feet.
 
While turboprop and turbofan engines function differently, they are both safe and reliable options for your aircraft for different reasons. A turboprop’s propellers are the main safety hazard with their design as the blades move quickly and can cause harm to anyone nearby. Additionally, the propeller needs adequate clearance from any part of the plane that could lead to aerodynamic issues. The design of turbofans allows them to be mounted in close quarters without the issue of aerodynamics as the propeller is not a concern. While turboprop engines produce vibrations, they also are less prone to heating, and are safe and reliable for purchase.
 
If you are in the market for a cost-efficient engine for aircraft flying at subsonic speeds, a turboprop engine will offer the most for your money. At the same time, if you are operating at speeds faster than that of sound, a turbofan engine will prove more efficient. Whatever your needs, you can rely on ASAP Fasteners for premium and reliable hardware and aerospace parts. Owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, quality is the cornerstone of our business, and we operate under AS9120B, ISO 9001:2015, and FAA AC 00-56B accreditation, alongside a No China sourcing policy. Additionally, we have a team of experts working around the clock 24/7x365 who can answer any questions via phone or email. If you have a specific part in mind to purchase, allow us to become your parts procurement partner and get started by filling out and submitting a Request for Quote form. Within 15 minutes, you can expect to receive a custom, competitive quote on any item! 


Read more »


Modern aircraft are designed to operate under various stressors, one of which is weight. Although the exact capacity that each plane can tolerate differs significantly, an average-sized commercial aircraft typically holds 175,000lbs upon takeoff. With such immense weight applied to the vessel, it is critical for the flight crew to perform accurate calculations that can accurately determine the aircraft's center of gravity while also predicting if that point will change during flight. These requirements are called load and trim calculations, and this area of aircraft safety is tightly regulated by FAA mandates. In this blog, we will discuss the procedures and calculations associated with aircraft load in trim while also discussing the risks associated with improper estimations.


Read more »


Aircraft contain numerous systems that require tubing, bearings, valves, and more. One of the most important, but often overlooked, structural components are flexible hoses. Flexible hoses are utilized in aircraft fluid systems in particular to connect moving parts with stationary parts in areas that are subject to vibration or where increased flexibility is needed. More than that, flexible hoses can serve as a connector in metal tubing systems.


Read more »


Compact in design and energy-efficient, servo motors are actuators that serve countless applications. These features enable them to operate remote-controlled or radio-controlled toy cars, robots, and aircraft. Furthermore, they find use in pharmaceutics, in-line manufacturing, and food services. Versatile in function, this blog will cover how they work and their importance.


Read more »


Automobiles are advanced vehicle types that many rely on every single day, but some may not be familiar with the various mechanical systems that make their operations possible. For instance, having the ability to turn wheels left and right is an extremely important aspect of driving, and this capability is often provided by an assembly of mechanical components that work together as one drives. For a majority of passenger cars, small trucks, and SUVs, the ability to steer is made possible through the rack and pinion steering system. To help you better understand how this system benefits automobiles, we will discuss its design and functionality in more detail.


Read more »


There are a number of buttons in a cockpit that allow a pilot to control and navigate the aircraft with ease. Located in the nose of aircraft, these buttons are responsible for the various actions that pilots are able to use during takeoff, flight, and landing. With this in mind, this blog will provide a brief overview of all the buttons, switches, and levers found in the flight deck , allowing you to better understand their importance.


Read more »


The aircraft engine is paramount for standard flight operations, allowing for fuel-and-air mixtures to be combusted for the means of generating the necessary propulsion for lift. While in flight, engines and other aircraft apparatuses are constantly exposed to various stressors and elements, thus warranting the need for robust assemblies that can guard sensitive components. The nacelle of an aircraft is the housing that serves to protect the engine from such elements while increasing aerodynamics. Alongside guarding the engine, they also house instruments, fuel tanks, weaponry, and other equipment. In this blog, we will discuss the design and components of the nacelle, allowing you to better understand their use and importance.


Read more »


Bolts are indispensable components found in machines that we encounter daily. In fact, bolts are one of the most common and diverse fasteners on the market. Bolts come in a variety of shapes and sizes which will determine their application. In this blog, we will discuss how a bolt works, what the different types are, and the difference between a bolt and a screw.


Read more »


O-rings and gaskets are two common hardware components that are regularly compared to one another, both often being used to produce a seal between two or more mating components. O-rings and gaskets are found in countless assemblies ranging from plumbing assemblies to advanced machinery, serving to prevent leaking for the benefit of assemblies. Despite their shared role, both components do have their own unique designs and features that set them apart.


Read more »


Bearings are common elements of moving assemblies, serving to bear loads and reduce friction between contacting surfaces in motion. Thrust bearings in particular are a more specialized type, capable of taking on the axial loads of rotating devices. Such bearings can come in a number of forms to cater towards different applications and requirements, and common types include rolling element thrust bearings and fluid-film thrust bearings. In this blog, we will discuss the main thrust bearing types that are available on the market to help you find exactly what is needed for your operations.


Read more »


Bearings are common elements found in applications ranging from clocks to industrial machinery, implemented within assemblies to reduce friction between moving surfaces and to smooth rotational motion. While bearings serve to prevent the quick breakdown of various assemblies, they themselves can also face wear and tear over time. In order to maintain the service life and reliability of bearings, one must conduct regular maintenance and proper handling procedures.


Read more »


Fasteners are extremely common elements for aircraft construction, often accounting for half of the total parts of many popular airline models. As fasteners are components tasked with joining parts together to form assemblies, they can come in a plethora of types to accommodate diverse needs and materials. While common fasteners such as rivets, bolts, screws, and nuts are well discussed in the aviation sector, some may be unfamiliar with the more specialized types that serve important roles for aircraft construction. In this blog, we will provide a brief overview of some of the special types of aircraft fasteners that are commonly used, allowing you to understand their applications and importance.


Read more »


Machine pins, also known as pin fasteners, fastening pins, or simply pins, are a type of specialty fasteners used to align and join two components together. Pins are available in semi-permanent and quick-release models. Semi-permanent pins may require additional pressure or tools for installation and removal, while quick release pins will typically feature a spring-loaded mechanism which locks them into place to allow for easy installation and removal. Additionally, pins come in a broad range of sizes and materials with different designs to suit a wide array of applications.


Read more »


Pillow block bearings are a type of housed bearing unit used with a machined mounting surface and found in mechanical power transmission systems where they support shafts and couplings. The shaft is perpendicular to the mounting screws and parallel to the mounting surface. Pillow block bearings can come in many types, such as ball bearing, cylindrical bearing, tapered roller bearing, or synthetic bushing. In this blog, we will discuss the basics of pillow block bearings.


Read more »


A flanged ball bearing is a type of ball bearing specially engineered to provide a precise mounting. This is done through the axial location of the bearing’s shaft ends, which stabilizes the bearing’s positioning to maximize the load support. When using a ball bearing with a shaft axis that is perpendicular to the mount, flanged bearings facility either rotary or linear movement. There are many types of bearing flanges, each with differing designs and cages tailored to their specific ball bearings to maximize their loading and speed capabilities while enabling the two devices to function harmoniously. Flange bearings are screwed in relation to the shaft axis, meaning flanged roller bearings consist of an insert attached to a relatively flat housing structure.


Read more »


A bearing is a mechanical component that may be implemented within an assembly to facilitate rotating motion and mitigate the forces of friction. As components that are tasked with the transferring of axial and radial loads to supporting structures, bearings must exhibit high amounts of precision and durability while ensuring noise and vibration do not become an issue. With the various common types of bearing components available on the market, automobiles, aircraft, construction equipment, and other vehicles and devices can all benefit from load bearing and friction reduction. In this blog, we will discuss some of the more common bearing types, allowing you to find which is best for your given application.


Read more »


Electricity is an energy source that we now rely on for a grand number of applications, ranging from the powering of computers to lighting fixtures that illuminate spaces. As electricity can be derived from a variety of sources such as batteries and power grids, specific components are needed to transmit electricity correctly to accommodate a specific application. Known as power connectors, such components can come in a variety of forms to carry and transport voltage.


Read more »


A bearing is a mechanical device used to prevent direct metal to metal contact between two elements in relative motion. This prevents friction and heat generation and ultimately slows the natural process of wear and tear. Furthermore, because bearings replace sliding motion with low friction rolling, energy consumption is also reduced. In addition to this, bearings also serve the purpose of transmitting loads from the rotating element to the housing. This load can be radial, axial, or a combination of both. Though a wide range of bearing types exist, they are generally separated into one or two major types: ball bearings and roller bearings. This blog will discuss both of these bearing types and their unique characteristics.


Read more »


Despite aircraft being built from the highest quality materials, those materials would be rendered obsolete if they were not properly affixed to one another. This is where fasteners come in. Though they are small, seemingly insignificant parts, fasteners are the most critical part of an aircraft. Without them, aircraft could not be assembled, let alone withstand the extreme conditions they are subjected to during flight. In fact, in an entire aircraft, roughly half of all parts are fasteners.


Read more »


Bolts, nails, and screws are all examples of fasteners. A lesser-known, but just as important fastener, is the rivet. A rivet is a permanent mechanical fastener used to join two plates together. Because rivets are permanent (meaning they cannot be removed) their joints are incredibly strong and similar to those of adhesive or welded joints. It is a cylindrical piece of steel usually made from low carbon, but can also be made from aluminum, monel (a type of nickel alloy), or copper, depending on the application’s weight and corrosion-resistance requirements.


Read more »


Recent Twitter Posts